As you move through life, you may find your NDIS plan is no longer right for you. This is a normal part of your NDIS journey – particularly as plans now can last for longer than a year.

Fortunately, you can always request a change to your plan. In this article we explore the best ways to do that depending on your reason for wanting the change and share some tips to ensure you get the supports and budget you need.   

The length of time that it takes for a plan review can depend on lots of different factors like the urgency of the request, where you’re located and the amount of evidence you need. We recommend that you submit your request as soon as you can and follow up with your Local Area Coordinator to stay up to date with the progress of your request.

Reason 1: You’ve had a change in your living situation
A ‘Change of Circumstances’ review

If you’ve had a significant change in your life, your NDIS plan might not be suited to your situation anymore. Some examples of significant changes include:

  • You’re moving out of your family home and into an apartment of your own
  • A key member of your informal support network is moving interstate
  • You get a new job
  • You have a change in your disability and require different supports

The NDIS calls this a ‘Change of Circumstances’ and have a specific form you can fill out if a significant change occurs in your life.

If you submit a Change of Circumstances form, the NDIS may decide a formal plan review is needed. If this occurs, taking plenty of supporting evidence to the planning meeting can help give you the best chance of getting the supports you’re after.

If you want to switch to plan management ask for a desktop or 'light touch' review.

Reason 2: Your NDIS plan is expiring
A formal plan review

Approaching your plan’s end date presents a good opportunity to ask yourself “are my plan, NDIS goals and funding still relevant and meeting my needs?”

If they are and you don’t want to make any changes to your plan, you can request a “rollover” – this means you keep your current plan.

However, if you’re not happy with your plan you can ask for a full plan review. This gives you the opportunity to get a plan that’s more suited to your current situation.

The NDIS will contact you before your plan’s end date to discuss what you’d like to do. If you do request a plan review, it helps to be as specific as possible about your situation, support needs and what you’d like changed in your plan.

Reason 3: You’re not happy with the plan you’ve been given
An Internal review

If you’ve just received a new NDIS plan and it’s not what you were hoping for, you can request a change too. Perhaps you didn’t get enough budget for a particular support or you feel your plan doesn’t accurately reflect your situation. If this occurs, you have three months to have it reviewed. The NDIS calls this an ‘internal review’.

When Tristram got his new plan, he was hoping for something different. Watch how he went about requesting an internal review:

To do this, contact the NDIS and let them know that you’re unhappy with your plan and would like to request an internal review. Clearly explain anything you feel wasn’t taken into account during your planning meeting and mention any additional information that might help. Be clear about how the decision has impacted you and what you’d like to see in your new plan.

If you’re still not happy with the result of this internal review, you have 28 days to appeal the decision at the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

How long does a review normally take?

The length of time that it takes for a plan review can depend on lots of different factors like the urgency of the request, where you’re located and the amount of evidence you need. We recommend that you submit your request as soon as you can and follow up with your Local Area Coordinator to stay up to date with the progress of your request.

Need help?

If you need some additional assistance requesting any of these plan reviews or preparing for a planning meeting, support coordination can be a very helpful service. A support coordinator can work with you to review your plan and work out what’s working and what isn’t. They’ll also help you develop goals that are suited to your situation and will allow you to access the supports you want.